Creative Coup hates industry jargon A LOT
We hate red tape A LOT
We think the design industry is full of err….A SIGNIFICANT AMOUNT of horse manure.
 
This is why we have gone down the route of a Creative Takeover. YOUR creative takeover.
However much possible, we will endeavour to equip startups and small business such as yours, to do things themselves.
 
Why not bigger and more established companies?
No reason.
  • We could help them go back to naked basics. (not literally of course)
  • We could fight the corporate machine in order to prevent, what started as good design, from degenerating into the collective opinion of a board of accountants. (Nothing against accountants, I am a former recovering finance manager. We all have our skeletons.)
Been there and got a well-designed t-shirt. Sometimes.
But life is short and before we became sufficiently jaded, we started doing more work for startups and smaller businesses, where the owner(s) still had a dream and cared. They cared…and so did we. Resulting in good work all round. Happy days.
 
For the most part, (of course I am generalising, otherwise this wouldn’t work), the big guys have been fed the aforementioned horse manure by agencies and eaten said horse manure for a long time.
 
Enough that they happily pay for stuff they don’t need, attend meetings that achieve the aim of arranging more meetings, and think that if they don’t see a team of twenty arriving at their offices, they won’t be getting good branding.
 
HERE IS THE TRUTH: 
 
Your product or service is either a good product or service, or a bad one. Our design might get it noticed, but won’t change the fact that said product or service is either good or bad, or even worse…. just… meh.
 
Further, we strongly believe that creative rationale is (mostly) just regurgitated noise fighting for a chance to be heard amidst the noise all the other agencies are creating, doing the same for their clients and their client’s products.
 
Don’t be mistaken, we’re not saying words like fun, serious, corporate, playful etc. have no meaning, but that’s it. Design and branding either looks great, fits your company and its message, or it doesn’t. Simple.
 
Who decides? Not us. You.
 
And then after that, on a daily basis, so does every single human that interacts with your branding. And they’ll decide using all the inherently imperfect human qualities that make us decide something is cool or not, every single day.
 
For those that have not had the (dis)pleasure of dealing with a traditional agency, let us give you an idea of the kind of thing we’re talking about:
Your company sells healthy goat’s cheese.
 
The team of twenty (one senior rockstar designer, eighteen juniors, and one eager intern) have just given you a rousing presentation of your new branding, including your new logo showing a goat on a skateboard.
 
What’s with the skateboard you ask?
 
You are told: “The skateboard represents youth and vitality, the very essence of healthy living. Skaters have a repetition for rebellion against the status quo and we think this ties in perfectly with the idea of healthy goat’s milk cheese, taking over from cow’s milk cheese. A healthy rebellion if you will.
 
You secretly think it looks ridiculous and you’ve not been anywhere near a skateboard in thirty years. But there are twenty of them and only one of you. At least three of the junior designers have big beards and big biceps. You don’t fancy your chances.
 
Besides, you’ve paid A LOT of money for this. 
 
In essence, what was once a good idea generated by an individual within an agency team gets diluted by all the cooks and politics, ending up as 10% of the genius it might have been.
 
“Often, the best ideas are ones that escaped the scrutiny and input of the many.”

Does this mean we don’t brainstorm as a team in order to let many brains regurgitate on the same problem? Of course not. We just pay attention to the number of brains involved, their brain-like powers, and importantly, which stage of the process we involve them in!

Not all agencies think the same way. Now you know. 

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